Grants Made from the Access to Justice Fund

  • National Grantees
  • Regional Grantees

Grants Made from the Access to Justice Fund Map

Note: National Grants are grants that serve residents of more than one Canadian province and territory. Provincial grants are grants that serve residents of one province, either in part of that province or throughout. The map shows the location of the grantee’s head office; however, the grant may be delivered in other locations. For example, a Toronto organization may be funded to deliver a project exclusively in Thunder Bay.

All grants made from the Access to Justice Fund to date are listed here:

Aamjinwnaang First Nation (Sarnia, ON), in conjunction with Osgoode Hall Law School, will hold a community forum on environmental law and mount an arts-based educational project for youth.

The Aboriginal Legal Services of Toronto (Toronto, ON) will increase the reach, scope and accessibility of the website www.fasdjustice.ca, a go-to web resource for information on FASD and the justice system. Project activities will include a visual overhaul of the site, content development, case law updates, implementation of a social media strategy, and training delivery, to ensure that the site is reliable and current tool.

The Aboriginal Legal Services of Toronto (Toronto, ON) will undertake two projects. First, it will prepare a video to help families of murdered and missing Indigenous people navigate the justice system and access legal supports. Second, it will prepare a video and handbook for lawyers to assist them in working more effectively with Indigenous clients.

The Aboriginal Legal Services of Toronto (Toronto, ON) will lead a project to diagnose Aboriginal clients in the remand population for Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD). The purpose of the project is to determine whether a diagnosis of FASD will affect the sentencing process.

The Action Committee on Access to Justice in Civil and Family Matters (Toronto, ON) will build public access to justice education tools, and an Innovation Toolbox to advance public legal education about the importance of understanding and engaging in legal issues.

The Alberta Legal Information Society (Edmonton, AB) will develop the first phase of a project to create an online public legal information portal in Alberta.

The Algoma Community Legal Clinic (Sault Ste. Marie, ON) will hire an Articling Student for 2016-2017 to provide legal information and services to residents of rural and remote communities. This Articling position is funded through the Connecting Articling Fellowship program.

The Algoma Community Legal Clinic (Sault Ste. Marie, ON) will hire an Articling Student for 2015-2016 to provide legal information and services to residents of rural and remote communities. This Articling position is funded through the Connecting Articling Fellowship program.

The Barbra Schlifer Commemorative Clinic (Toronto, ON) as lead organization for the Ontario Network of Language Interpretation Services will train interpreters to work effectively in the legal sector and train lawyers and paralegals to work effectively with interpreters. This project arises out of the Connecting Legal Interpretation initiative.

The Barbra Schlifer Commemorative Clinic (Toronto, ON) will assist victims of domestic violence who are being held in detention pending a refugee status determination.

The Barbra Schlifer Commemorative Clinic (BSCC) and Springtide Resources (Toronto, ON) will develop training materials for Deaf and ASL Interpreters to work with victims of domestic violence. Ten Deaf and ASL Interpreters were trained using these materials and are providing interpretive services through the BSCC.

Dr. Yvonne Boyer at Brandon University (Brandon, MB) will conduct legal research and analysis on the Constitution rights to health for Indigenous inmates in the federal and provincial systems.

The British Columbia Coalition of People with Disabilities (Vancouver, BC), in partnership with PovNet and the Community Legal Assistance Society, will develop an online training course for workers helping clients with CPP disability proceedings and a self-help manual for clients who are applying for CPP disability benefits.

The British Columbia Law Institute, Canadian Centre for Elder Law division (Vancouver, BC) will undertake a two-year research and public legal education project to identify the legal issues and barriers affecting vulnerable investors who wish to invest, or continue managing their existing investments, under a Supported Decision Making approach, the aim of which is to maximize access to investment options while minimizing the loss of autonomy. The CCEL will also produce a suite of tools for people with capacity challenges, their supporters and investment industry members.

The Calgary Immigrant Women’s Association (Calgary, AB) will create a position of a part-time coordinator at its onsite pro bono legal clinic to help clients with paperwork, provide ongoing support to clients, and provide referrals to those not eligible for legal clinic services.

The Canadian Council of Muslim Women (Gananoque, ON) will hold a “train the trainer” session on its Muslim Marriage Contract Kit for members of its chapters in Western Canada.

The Canadian Environmental Law Association (Toronto, ON) will assist First Nations to develop source water protection plans.

The Canadian Foundation for Advancement of Investor Rights (Toronto, ON), will undertake a comparative study of legislative and regulatory approaches that allow financial services firms and investment advisors to take immediate, short-term protective action for the benefit of vulnerable customers who may have lost capacity to give instructions due to dementia or other causes or who may be being subjected to undue influence, including elder financial abuse. FAIR will use the study results to develop a model protocol for taking protective action and, if warranted by the research, a regulatory framework establishing a legal safe harbour or similar mechanism for Canada.

The Canadian Hearing Society (Toronto, ON) will provide technology and training to staff at three Ontario community legal clinics to enable staff to support Deaf and Hard-of-hearing clients with remote video interpreting services.

The Canadian Identity Theft Support Centre (Vancouver, BC) will operate a support centre for victims of identity theft.

The Canadian Research Institute for Law and the Family (Calgary, AB) will encourage lawyers and the public to use limited scope retainers where full retainer counsel is not possible, not affordable or not desired. It will assess lawyers’ and clients’ experience with limited scope work. The two-year project will result in a report that evaluates the experiences of lawyers and clients participating in the program.

The Centre de Justice de Proximité du Grand Montréal (Montréal, QC) will provide plain language legal information, assistance and support; referrals to other community organizations, professionals, and government resources; and help filling out court forms to the general public.

The Centre de Justice de Proximité de Québec (Québec , QC) will provide plain language legal information, assistance and support; referrals to other community organizations, professionals, and government resources; and help filling out court forms to the general public.

The Centre de Justice de Proximité de Rimouski (Rimouski, QC) will provide plain language legal information, assistance and support; referrals to other community organizations, professionals, and government resources; and help filling out court forms to the general public.

The Centre for Equality Rights in Accommodation (Toronto, ON) will conduct a series of webinars and workshops in Ontario on housing and human rights. This is a Connecting Communities project with legal and non-legal partners.

The Centre for Information and Community Services (Toronto, ON) will train two Community Legal Information Mentors to provide in-depth training and ongoing support in the areas of employment and immigration law to front-line staff at agencies serving Chinese-speaking clients. This is a Connecting Communities project with legal and non-legal partners.

Centre Pro Bono Québec (Montréal, QC) will develop an online directory of free and low-cost legal resources and services available in Québec.

The Child Protection Parent Education Committee (Halifax, NS) will translate a child protection booklet into the Mi’kmaq language. The booklet accompanies the legal information DVD on child protection proceedings created with a previous Law Foundation of Ontario grant.

The Child Protection Parent Education Committee (Halifax, NS) will produce and distribute a plain language, accessible DVD to parents involved in the Child Protection system in rural Nova Scotia.

The Child Protection Parent Education Committee (Halifax, NS) will dub the soundtrack of a plain language DVD in Mi’kmaq. The DVD provides legal information to parents involved in child protection proceedings in Nova Scotia.

Coalition des Associations de Consommateurs du Québec (Montréal, QC) will develop a comprehensive guide on class actions to educate its members organizations and help them identify potential class actions. The Guide is available online.

Communication Disabilities Access Canada will provide training to disability advocates, including social workers, speech-language pathologists, peer support workers, and family members in three areas of law – consent and capacity, housing and attendant services, and access to essential services – that impact people who have speech and language disabilities (SLDs), not caused by hearing loss. The aim of the training is to increase the ability of front-line workers to support their clients who have SLDs who are facing legal problems.

The Community Advocacy and Legal Clinic (Belleville, ON) will hire an Articling Student for 2016-2017 to provide legal information and services to residents of rural and remote communities. This Articling position is funded through the Connecting Articling Fellowship program.

The Community Advocacy and Legal Clinic (Belleville, ON) will hire an Articling Student for 2012-2013 to provide legal information and services to residents of this rural community. This Articling position is funded through the Connecting Articling Fellowship program.

The Community Advocacy and Legal Centre (Belleville, ON) will hire an Articling Student for 2013-2014 to provide legal information and services to residents of this rural community. This Articling position is funded through the Connecting Articling Fellowship program.

The Community Advocacy and Legal Centre (Belleville, ON) will hire an Articling Student for 2014-2015 to provide legal information and services to residents of this rural community. This Articling position is funded through the Connecting Articling Fellowship program.

The Community Advocacy and Legal Centre (Belleville, ON) will hire an Articling Student for 2015-2016 to provide legal information and services to residents of rural and remote communities. This is a Connecting Communities project with legal and non-legal partners.

The Community Advocacy and Legal Centre (Belleville, ON) will develop a Connecting Region proposal in Belleville. A Connecting Region is a regional planning model in which a group of legal and non-legal organizations will work together to test strategies to improve access to justice for rural communities.

The Community Development Council Durham (Ajax, ON) will deliver workshops on the social assistance system for service providers who work with linguistic minorities. The workshops will be delivered using advanced video conferencing technology to enable people in remote and rural areas to participate. The project will evaluate the efficacy of using this technology for delivering public legal education. This is a Connecting Communities project with legal and non-legal partners.

The Community Law School Sarnia-Lambton (Sarnia, ON) will train service providers in rural and remote communities on consumer protection issues.

Community Legal Education Ontario/Education juridique communautaire Ontario and the Ontario Library Association (Toronto, ON) will develop and offer an eight-week online certification course for library staff on key aspects of legal information and referral. The aim of the course is to increase the capacity of library staff to help patrons who have legal problems.

The Community Legal Clinic (Simcoe, Haliburton, Kawartha Lakes, ON) will hire an Articling Student for 2012-2013 to provide legal information and services to residents of this rural and remote community. This Articling position is funded through the Connecting Articling Fellowship program.

The Community Legal Clinic (Simcoe, Haliburton, Kawartha Lakes, ON) will hire an Articling Student for 2013-2014 to provide legal information and services to residents of this rural community. This Articling position is funded through the Connecting Articling Fellowship program.

The Community Legal Clinic (Simcoe, Haliburton, Kawartha Lakes, ON) will hire an Articling Student for 2014-2015 to provide legal information and services to residents of this rural community. This Articling position is funded through the Connecting Articling Fellowship program.

The Community Legal Clinic (Simcoe, Haliburton, Kawartha Lakes, ON) will develop a proposal for a Connecting Region. A Connecting Region is a regional planning model in which a group of legal and non-legal organizations will work together to test strategies to improve access to justice for rural communities.

The Community Legal Clinic of York Region (Richmond Hill, ON) will hire an Articling Student for 2012-2013 to provide legal information and services to linguistic minorities in this community. This Articling position is funded through the Connecting Articling Fellowship program.

In this three-year research study Community Legal Education Ontario (Toronto, ON), working in partnership with the Institute for Social Research at York University, will examine the effectiveness of Public Legal Education and Information (PLEI) in helping people with low and modest incomes address their legal problems. The research, conducted at sites in Ontario and British Columbia, will collect and examine qualitative and quantitative data on the factors or characteristics that contribute to PLEI’s effectiveness in supporting positive outcomes in a range of circumstances along the legal services continuum.

Community Legal Education Ontario (Toronto, ON) will create the Connecting Communities Consortium Secretariat to coordinate and support the activities of a group of legal and non-legal organizations working to improve access to justice for linguistic minorities and rural and remote communities.

Community Legal Education Ontario (Toronto, ON) will conduct research to explore the value and effectiveness of public legal education services throughout the continuum of legal services delivery.

As Secretariat for Connecting Communities, Community Legal Education Ontario (Toronto, ON) will support and facilitate projects recommended by the Consortium, the Training Committee, and the Public Legal Education Learning Exchange.

The Community Legal Information Association of PEI (Charlottetown, PEI) will recruit, train, mentor and supervise students on a Legal Studies track from the University of Prince Edward Island and Holland College to provide legal information to clients on its Legal Inquiry Line.

Connecting Ottawa (Ottawa, ON) is a consortium of over 35 legal and non-legal organizations that will implement a regional plan to provide legal information and referrals to linguistic minorities.

The Council for Agencies Serving South Asians (Toronto, ON) will train front-line workers, faith leaders and community representatives in the Greater Toronto South Asian Community on the recent changes to the family sponsorship and refugee law.

Courthouse Libraries BC (Vancouver, BC) will develop presentations for the PLEAC conference in Montreal (2010), give webinars exploring possible models for the provision of online Public Legal Education (PLE), and host a national conference on online PLE in Vancouver.

Courthouse Libraries BC (Vancouver, BC) will follow up on its national conference on public legal education by developing a series of webinars, workshops and an online Public Legal Education best practices guide.

Critical Link International (Toronto, ON) will hold a conference for interpreters, legal professionals and stakeholders in community interpreting to discuss recent international research on language access and language rights issues. Key themes include legal interpretation and Aboriginal interpretation.

Dalhousie Legal Aid Service (Halifax, NS) will train community workers in rural Nova Scotia to assist on poverty law issues, including income assistance and residential tenancies. Community workers will include workers in organizations such as women’s shelters, youth shelters and Aboriginal healing centres.

The Indigenous Blacks & Mi’kmaq Initiative, Schulich School of Law, Dalhousie University, (Dalhousie, NS) will continue their core work of reducing structural and systemic discrimination by increasing the representation of Indigenous Black and Mi’kmaq lawyers. It will also provide legal information sessions on domestic violence, human rights, wills and estates and the use of Gladue reports to Mi’kmaq communities.

Éducaloi (Montreal, QC), a leading Quebec public legal education organization, will develop a plain language legal information kit and workshop, in both French and English, to support seniors when making investment decisions. Éducaloi will address three topics dealing with investor rights: the legal duties and responsibilities of financial and investment professionals; investment fraud and legal recourses; and powers of attorney and protection mandates to ensure seniors’ investment decisions are respected.

Éducaloi (Montreal, QC), will spearhead a major public legal education initiative in the area of consumer rights, including the creation of web-based content and outreach to youth.

The Elizabeth Fry Society of Ottawa (Ottawa, ON) will hire and train an Indigenous peer support worker who will provide peer support to Indigenous women who are incarcerated or at risk of incarceration and who are reintegrating into the community after incarceration. The peer support worker will act as peer advocate and resource and will provide court support to women navigating the criminal justice system.

The Elizabeth Fry Society of Ottawa (Ottawa, ON) will hire an Aboriginal Liaison Peer Support Worker, who is an Aboriginal woman with lived experience in the criminal justice system, to provide legal information to Aboriginal women who are incarcerated or released on community supervision orders.

The Ending Violence Association of B.C. (Vancouver, BC) will provide legal education to Indigenous service providers to enhance their capacity for understanding and addressing complex issues related to violence against women, access to justice, and legal policies.

The Ending Violence Association of B.C. (Vancouver, BC) will train front line service providers who work with Aboriginal communities on domestic violence issues.

Equay-Wuk  (Sioux Lookout, Ontario) will train Aboriginal community workers and Elders in 31 remote communities in northern Ontario in the law as it relates to violence against women and human rights. This is a Connecting Communities project with legal and non-legal partners.

The FCJ Refugee Centre (Toronto, ON) will develop and deliver training for English as a Second Language (ESL) teachers and support staff to better equip them to respond to issues related to immigration and human rights, including the refugee process. This is a Connecting Communities project with legal and non-legal partners.

The Federation of Metro Tenants Associations (Toronto, ON) will hold a series of trainings aimed at providing front-line workers with in-depth education on tenants’ rights in six rural communities across Ontario. This is a Connecting Communities Project with legal and non-legal partners.

The Federation of Metro Tenants Associations (Toronto, ON) will hold a series of trainings aimed at providing settlement workers with an in-depth education on tenants’ rights. This is a Connecting Communities project with legal and non-legal partners.

La Fondation du Barreau du Quebec (Montreal, QC) will examine the decisions of self-regulatory bodies (IIROC, MFDA and CSF) over the last five years in Ontario and Quebec with a view to determining whether and to what extent vulnerability is taken into consideration in disciplinary proceedings and to making recommendations for stronger vulnerable investor protection.

La Fondation du Barreau du Quebec (Montreal, QC) will produce guides for self-represented litigants in criminal and administrative law matters. The guides will be modeled on a successful existing guide in civil matters and will be available in French and English.

Grand Council Treaty #3 (Kenora, ON) will hire an education coordinator who will develop and facilitate education seminars on the criminal justice system in 28 Anishinaabe communities located in Ontario and Manitoba. The education seminars will be delivered to youth and community members, and responds to Band leadership and in schools to educate community members (victims and offenders) about the criminal justice system. During community forums held to collect input for the 2013 Iacobucci Report  on First Nations representation on juries, members and Elders from 24 of the 28 GCT3 communities identified the need for legal education in criminal law, particularly for youth and their families.

The Hispanic Development Council (Toronto, ON) will educate Latino Hispanic social and community workers and community leaders on child welfare law and courts. This is a Connecting Communities project with legal and non-legal partners.

The Huron Women’s Shelter (Goderich, ON) will trains front-line staff working in the violence against women sector and in other grassroots agencies in rural Huron County on the intersection between poverty and mental health law. This is a Connecting Communities project with legal and non-legal partners.

The Indian Youth Friendship Society (Thunder Bay, ON) will hire an Indigenous Peoples’ Court Coordinator (“Court Coordinator”), whose main role will be to assist with the continuing development and implementation of the Indigenous People’s Court using the Aboriginal Settlement Conference Suite to support justice-involved Indigenous people who are navigating the courts, in a culturally appropriate way. Indigenous Elders will be recruited to work in tandem with local judiciary to facilitate healing for youth and adult offenders.

The Indigenous Bar Association (Ottawa, ON), in partnership with the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada will undertake a national initiative to develop restorative justice processes for Aboriginal communities based on Indigenous legal traditions in order to address the legacy of residential schools.

Innocence Canada (Toronto, ON) will undertake a legal education project to disseminate information about the causes and consequences of wrongful convictions to stakeholders in the criminal justice system.  The project will focus on the particular vulnerabilities of Indigenous and racialized populations to being wrongly convicted in an effort to create systemic changes.

Interfaith Initiatives for Civic Engagement (Toronto, ON) will provide members of Ontario’s faith sector with relevant knowledge about key poverty law areas and how these relate to situations where an individual has mental health issues. The project will enhance the capabilities and capacities of the faith sector to identify legal issues and be able to provide pre-crisis and referral supports to individuals living in poverty and with mental health-related issues.

The John Howard Society of Grande Prairie (Grande Prairie, AB) will provide court support for self-represented litigants in criminal and family law courts, including help with paperwork, general information about the court processes, options for legal representation and referrals as appropriate.

In this two year project, the John Howard Society of Ontario (Toronto, ON), with the active support of Legal Aid Ontario and the Canadian Civil Liberties Association, and further assistance from the Canadian Mental Health Association Ontario and Justice for Children and Youth, will develop and execute a research, education, and policy initiative on youth bail in Ontario. This initiative will address the gaps and barriers in accessing reasonable and timely bail for youth in Ontario and develop evidence-based solutions to the problems.

The Justice Education Society of BC (Vancouver, BC) will pilot the delivery of an innovative, online self-help tool to self-represented litigants appearing on family or other civil matters before the BC Supreme Court. It will also provide a telephone support service in partnership with Vancouver’s Justice Access Centre.

Justice for Children and Youth (Thunder Bay, ON) will educate youth workers through providing workshops on the Youth Criminal Justice Act and youth records, education law (suspensions, expulsions) and human rights. Many of the youth workers who will be trained work with Aboriginal youth. This is a Connecting Communities project with legal and non-legal partners.

The Keewaytinok Native Legal Services (Moosonee, ON) will hire an Articling Student for 2012-2013 to provide legal information and services to residents of this remote community. This Articling position is funded through the Connecting Articling Fellowship program.

The Keewaytinok Native Legal Services (Moosonee, ON) will hire an Articling Student for 2013-2014 to provide legal information and services to residents of this remote community. This Articling position is funded through the Connecting Articling Fellowship program.

The Keewaytinok Native Legal Services (Moosonee, ON) will hire an Articling Student for 2014-2015 to provide legal information and services to residents of this remote community. This Articling position is funded through the Connecting Articling Fellowship program.

The Keewaytinok Native Legal Services (Moosonee, ON) will hire an Articling Student for 2015-2016 to provide legal information and services to linguistic minorities and residents of rural and remote communities. This Articling position is funded through the Connecting Articling Fellowship program.

The Keewaytinok Native Legal Services (Moosonee, ON) will hire an Articling Student for 2016-2017 to provide legal information and services to linguistic minorities and residents of rural and remote communities. This Articling position is funded through the Connecting Articling Fellowship program.

The Law Society of Nunavut (Iqaluit, NU) will provide public legal education across the territory to assist Nunavummiut to understand and exercise their legal rights in a number of areas of law, and will develop and implement youth outreach workshops in partnership with OJEN.

Legal Aid Ontario (Toronto, ON) will hire four Articling Students for 2012 – 2013 to provide legal information and services to linguistic minorities and residents of rural and remote communities. These Articling positions are funded through the Connecting Articling Fellowship program.

Legal Aid Ontario (Toronto, ON) will hire two Articling Students for 2014 – 2015 to provide legal information and services to linguistic minorities and residents of rural and remote communities in Timmins and Thunder Bay. These Articling positions are funded through the Connecting Articling Fellowship program.

The Legal Clinic (Perth, ON) will have an Articling student for 2015-2016 to provide legal information and services to residents of rural and remote communities. The Articling position is funded through the Connecting Articling Fellowship Program.

The Legal Clinic (Perth, ON) will have an Articling student for 2016-2017 to provide legal information and services to residents of rural and remote communities. The Articling position is funded through the Connecting Articling Fellowship program.

The Legal Help Centre of Winnipeg (Winnipeg, MB) will operate a drop-in legal information centre and legal clinic in downtown Winnipeg. The centre will be staffed by students and will be operated in partnership with the University of Winnipeg and the University of Manitoba.

The Legal Information Society of Nova Scotia (Halifax, NS) will pilot a model for coordinating and delivering pro bono legal services in the province.

Level (Toronto, ON) will hire a national program director for its ongoing “Dare to Dream” program. Through interactive justice education workshops and mentorship activities, Indigenous youth learn about the Canadian justice system, as well as the importance of incorporating Indigenous practices into criminal justice proceedings.

The LGBTQ Parenting Network (Toronto, ON) will develop legal education training materials addressing the needs of trans parents, and deliver this training to those who provide informal support to this community (trusted intermediaries) as well as those who provide formal support (legal support workers). This is a Connecting Communities project with legal and non-legal partners.

Lifeline Syria (Toronto, ON) will provide access to justice for those wishing to sponsor Syrian refugees. Lifeline Syria currently partners with the Refugee Sponsorship Support Program (SSP) to provide pro bono legal support to private sponsors as they navigate the complex rules and forms in order to sponsor Syrian refugees.  Lifeline Syria will hire a Project Coordinator for one year to provide critically needed coordinating functions in order to leverage and enhance the pro bono efforts of a very large number of lawyers and law students and an equally large number of refugee sponsors.

Luke’s Place Support and Resource Centre for Women and Children (Oshawa, ON) will continue and expand its pro bono clinic services for unrepresented women who have been or are victims of domestic violence and are dealing with divorce or separation and ancillary issues.

Matthew House Refugee Reception Services (Toronto, ON) will expand its Mock Refugee Hearing Program, which provides simulated or “mock” refugee hearings as a means of effectively preparing refugee claimants for their hearings before the Immigration and Refugee Board (IRB). The program provides an opportunity for refugees to be prepared for their hearing, as well as offering law students a chance to gain invaluable training and insight into the refugee determination process in Canada.

The Metro Toronto Chinese and Southeast Asian Legal Clinic (Toronto, ON) will hire an Articling Student for 2012-2013 to provide legal information and services to linguistic minorities. This Articling position is funded through the Connecting Articling Fellowship program.

The Metro Toronto Chinese and Southeast Asian Legal Clinic (Toronto, ON) will hire an Articling Student for 2013-2014 to provide legal information and services to linguistic minorities. This Articling position is funded through the Connecting Articling Fellowship program.

The Metro Toronto Chinese and Southeast Asian Legal Clinic (Toronto, ON) will hire an Articling Student for 2014-2015 to provide legal information and services to linguistic minorities. This Articling position is funded through the Connecting Articling Fellowship program.

The Metro Toronto Chinese and Southeast Asian Legal Clinic (Toronto, ON) will hire an Articling Student for 2015-2016 to provide legal information and services to linguistic minorities. This Articling position is funded through the Connecting Articling Fellowship program.

The Metro Toronto Chinese and Southeast Asian Legal Clinic (Toronto, ON) will hire an Articling Student for 2016-2017 to provide legal information and services to linguistic minorities. This Articling position is funded through the Connecting Articling Fellowship program.

MIAG Centre for Diverse Women and Families (Mississauga, ON), in partnership with legal professionals and clinics, will hold a series of workshops with front-line workers and community leaders on domestic and sexual violence, and parents’ rights and responsibilities towards their children. The goal of the project is to equip participants with the knowledge to share legal information with, and improve access to justice for, new immigrants and refugees.

The Migrant Workers Alliance for Change (Toronto, ON) will train front-line staff working with migrant workers and migrant worker leaders on new developments in labour and immigration law in the GTA and rural areas of Ontario.

The Mile End Legal Clinic (Montreal, QC) which provides pro bono legal services to low income people in Montreal. The Clinic will document its administrative policies, compile model legal opinions, update its case management system and website, and increase staff time to run the clinic.

The Multilingual Orientation Services Association for Immigrant Communities (Vancouver, BC) will deliver educational and informational workshops on violence against women to members of the South Asian community.

The National Aboriginal Achievement Foundation (Ottawa, ON) will deliver its education module on careers in the justice sector (lawyers, parole officers, court clerks, etc.) to twenty secondary schools with high populations of Aboriginal students. The project will solicit requests for deliveries from schools in northern Ontario, Quebec, the Northwest Territories, the Yukon and Atlantic Canada.

Native Counselling Services of Alberta (Edmonton, AB) will produce a video documentary that will examine how access to justice for Aboriginal people in remote, rural, and urban communities across Canada can be enhanced through the implementation of restorative processes aimed at supporting the legal actions and sanctions applied during the resolution of domestic violence cases.

The Native Law Centre (Saskatoon, SK) will continue to carry out its mandate and produce publications and educational activities related to Aboriginal peoples and the law in Canada.

The Native Law Centre (Saskatoon, SK) will enhance and sustain its Program of Legal Studies for Native People which offers legal education and skills instruction to Aboriginal students from across the country who have been admitted to law school.

The North York Women’s Centre (Toronto, ON) will provide workshops to settlement and community workers to enhance their ability to provide legal services information to assist newcomer women who do not speak English or French and who are experiencing, or are at risk of experiencing domestic violence. This is a Connecting Communities project with legal and non-legal partners.

The Ontario Council of Agencies Serving Immigrants (Toronto, ON), in partnership with the Colour of Poverty Campaign/Colour of Change Network, the Metro Toronto Chinese & South East Asian Legal Clinic, Rexdale Community Legal Clinic and the South Asian Legal Clinic of Ontario, will undertake research to identify barriers faced by racialized communities in accessing administrative tribunals and how these barriers affect the tribunal’s effectiveness and efficiency. They will also develop a tool and related policy on collecting disaggregated data that will help to eliminate or better understand the barriers faced by racialized communities in accessing tribunals.

The Ontario Federation of Indigenous Friendship Centres (OFIFC) will provide training workshops on human rights legislation, anti-discrimination protections, and the human rights enforcement process to community leaders within Indigenous Friendship Centre communities in Ontario. The project aims to promote education and awareness, advance access to justice and begin facilitating a dialogue about discrimination and human rights issues in Aboriginal communities across the province.

The Osgoode Hall Law School (Toronto, ON), in partnership with the Canadian Foundation for Advancement of Investor Rights, will develop and operate a pro-bono legal clinic and living lab to assist and educate harmed investors and collect relevant data. The clinic, staffed by law students under the supervision of practicing lawyers, will provide free advice to retail investors on how to proceed when they have suffered a loss due to fraud or other wrongdoing. The data collected will contribute to a better understanding of the issues faced by retail investors and how best to help them. The project will also produce publicly available “self-help” information. This will be the first legal clinic of its kind in Canada.

The Osgoode Society for Canadian Legal History (Toronto, ON) will produce a book-length history of the Ontario Court of Appeal, written by renowned Canadian historian and author Christopher Moore.

The People’s Law School (Vancouver, BC) will organize and deliver 40 performances of its Justice Theatre program to schools and communities with significant Indigenous populations in British Columbia, the Yukon, the Northwest Territories and Saskatchewan. The performances will focus on the role that restorative justice plays in Canada’s criminal justice system. The grant will also be used to develop teacher and student resources including a handbook of materials for teachers.

The People’s Law School (Vancouver, BC), along with other BC Public Legal Education (PLE) organizations, will provide PLE on non-profit legal issues to the non-profit sector.  In particular, it will focus on providing legal information regarding the 2012 changes to the BC Society Act, which is the legal framework governing non-profits in BC.

The People’s Law School (Vancouver, BC) will bring its long-running Justice Theatre programming to Aboriginal students in remote communities in northern B.C., the Yukon, and Saskatchewan. Justice Theatre performances are based on actual cases and allow students to participate as members of the jury.

Pivot Legal Society (Vancouver, BC) will provide individual legal advice to survivors of domestic violence and a series of workshops on issues pertaining to domestic violence for providers and survivors.

The Port Colborne Association for Resource Extension will train frontline staff working with young people and youth leaders on the law as it relates to sexting and cyberbullying, and the serious impact of these behaviours on victims. A video will be produced jointly with the Niagara Regional Police Services, which will provide a key training resource for the project. Workshops will be held throughout the Niagara Region and a webinar will be created and offered to the coordinators of the forty Youth Justice Committees throughout Ontario.

Pro Bono Ontario (Toronto, ON) will create an online tool that integrates frontline triage, application forms and administrative processing tasks with a portal to their case management software to enhance services for low-income self-represented litigants.

Pro Bono Ontario (Toronto, ON) will extend its Law Help model for providing pro bono legal services (currently in place in Toronto) to Ottawa. Volunteer lawyers in the court building will assist unrepresented litigants with procedural information, form completion and duty counsel representation.

Pro Bono Ontario (Toronto, ON) will hire a Fundraising Consultant to create a concise fundraising plan to sustain the Law Help Ontario, Ottawa project.

Pro Bono Students Canada (Toronto, ON) will improve and expand its award-winning Family Law Program which involves law students providing legal information to unrepresented litigants in family law proceedings.

The Public Legal Education and Information Service of New Brunswick (Fredericton, NB) will coordinate the delivery of up to 100 workshops on family law topics to self-represented litigants across the province.

The Public Legal Education Association (Saskatoon, SK) will develop a stand-alone web site for self-represented litigants dealing with family law issues in Saskatchewan. PLEA will develop a large amount of new content for the web site, which will offer legal information on a wide range of family law topics.

The Public Legal Information Association of Newfoundland and Labrador (St. John’s, NL) will create simple, easy-to-read information pamphlets explaining the basics of the child protection system, translated into 3 Indigenous languages common in Newfoundland and Labrador. Further, PLIAN will carry out a series of information sessions and community roundtables on the child protection system in several Indigenous communities.

The Public Legal Information Association of Newfoundland and Labrador (St. John’s, NL) will develop self-help kits that guide individuals through the steps for obtaining an uncontested divorce or serving as executor to an estate.

The Public Legal Information Association of Newfoundland and Labrador (St. John’s, NL) will deliver legal information sessions to service providers in rural Newfoundland that work with victims of domestic violence. The service providers will include social workers, nurses, transition house staff, police, violence prevention staff and government workers.

The Public Legal Information Association of Newfoundland and Labrador (St. John’s, NL) will produce and distribute safety and legal information for victims of abuse.

The Ryerson Law Research Centre (Toronto, ON) will develop a Tamil-English legal glossary containing standardized legal words and phrases. The glossary will be available to the public online.

Sandgate Women’s Shelter (Sutton West, ON) will train community workers and faith leaders serving victims of family violence on the criminal justice system. This is a Connecting Communities project with legal and non-legal partners.

Saqijuq (Kuujjuaq, QC) will conduct an evaluation of its pilot program, “A Change in Wind Direction.” The pilot program currently runs in the Inuit communities of Puvirnituq and Kangirsuk, located in northern Quebec, and aims to curb alcohol and drug abuse and reduce criminalization. The evaluation will use a collaborative research approach and will work with community members to frame the objectives of the research, indicators, sources of data and expected results.

The Coalition Assisting Trafficked Individuals (CATI) of the Sexual Assault Centre London proposes to develop and implement an innovative legal training project that will offer training to front line community agency staff as well as non-traditional service providers. The information will be offered to a wide range of intermediaries, both those traditionally considered service providers (i.e. shelter workers, health workers) as well as non-traditional intermediaries (i.e. individuals who work in hair and nail salons, hotels and restaurants). The project will increase participants’ awareness of the social and legal issues facing people who are being trafficked and will, most importantly, provide information and resources to them.

SEED Winnipeg (Winnipeg, MB), in partnership with the Legal Help Centre of Winnipeg, Momentum in Calgary and academics from Menno Simons College and Queen’s University, will research the experience of low-income registered education savings group plan subscribers and the regulatory context in which these plans are sold. Based on this research, SEED will develop and pilot public legal education materials on group plans tailored to address the needs of low income investors and community-based service providers.

The Social Health and Economic Development Society of Bella Coola (Bella Coola, BC) will use its legal advocacy program to deliver workshops on legal topics to the remote mid-coast Indigenous communities of Bella Bella and Klemtu and will provide client services through advocacy clinics for Indigenous members of those communities.

The Social Health and Economic Development Society of Bella Coola (Bella Coola, BC) will conduct outreach to expand the services of its legal advocate to remote communities in B.C.’s Central Coast area.

Sources Community Resources Society (Surrey, BC) will hire a South Asian Legal Educator to provide the South Asian community in the Lower Mainland with legal education, information and advocacy as it relates to violence against women and children.

The South Asian Legal Clinic of Ontario (Toronto, ON) will hire an Articling Student for 2015-2016 to provide legal information and services to linguistic minorities. This Articling position is funded through the Connecting Articling Fellowship program.

South Asian Legal Clinic of Ontario (Toronto, ON) will hire an Articling Student for 2016-2017 to provide legal information and services to linguistic minorities. This Articling position is funded through the Connecting Articling Fellowship program.

The South Ottawa Community Legal Service (Ottawa, ON) will develop a proposal for and implement a Connecting Region. A Connecting Region is a regional planning model in which a group of legal and non-legal organizations will work together to test strategies to improve access to justice for rural communities.

St. Paul’s Anglican Church (Vancouver, BC) will provide a legal advocacy and information program for homeless and low income individuals with a dedicated computer and an advocacy office director.

Tenant Resource and Advisory Centre (Vancouver, BC) will provide “train the trainer” workshops for community organization staff on residential tenancies issues and will conduct a media campaign on residential tenancies issues.

The Thunder Bay Indian Friendship Centre (Thunder Bay, ON) will to train Aboriginal Elders and front-line community workers in Thunder Bay in legal information relating to income security and human rights law.

The Toronto Workers’ Health and Safety Legal Clinic (Toronto, ON) will hire an Articling Student for 2012-2013 to provide legal information and services to linguistic minorities. This Articling position is funded through the Connecting Articling Fellowship program.

The Union of Ontario Indians (North Bay, ON) will develop an access to justice guide that will provide information and resources on how to navigate the Ontario court system for distribution in the Anishinabek Nation. UOI will seek input from Chiefs, Indigenous community leaders, and legal experts. Once the guide has been drafted, it will be translated into Anishinaabemowin, printed and distributed.

The University of Alberta, Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, (Edmonton, AB) will help inform a rehabilitation-oriented wellness court model for Nunavut. The research outcomes will assist the government of Nunavut as it moves forward in efforts to provide specific support to justice-involved Inuit in the territory.

The University of British Columbia, Faculty of Law (Vancouver, BC) will continue its Innocence Project in which law and journalism students, under the supervision of a lawyer, provide assistance to British Columbians who claim to have been wrongfully convicted of a serious offence.

The Refugee Sponsorship Program (SSP), based at the University of Ottawa (Ottawa, ON), brings together lawyers, law students, and refugee sponsorship experts to assist private refugee sponsors through the provision of pro bono legal services. During a period of intense national demand, the Law Foundation provided funding to support the SSP’s matching services (which matches lawyers with sponsorship groups), the recruitment and training of lawyers, and the coordination of legal clinics and public legal information sessions.

The University of Ottawa, Faculty of Law, Common Law Section (Ottawa, ON) will examine the remedies available for investors under the Ontario Securities Act for corporate misreporting in both prospectuses and continuous disclosures and will explore avenues to strengthen investor rights in these cases. The ultimate goal of the project is to develop appropriate, evidence-based policy recommendations for reform.

The University of Ottawa (Ottawa, ON) will produce self-help materials for refugee claimants and train refugee support workers in claim centres across Canada to assist claimants in preparation for the significant changes made to the refugee status determination process.

The University of Toronto, Faculty of Law (Toronto, ON) will explore whether new remedies, including a restitutionary remedy, should be available to investors who suffer from corporate wrongdoing, be it under securities law, corporate law or criminal law. This project will focus on the need for additional or alternative regulation in the area of investor remedies.

The University of Windsor (Windsor, ON) will host a conference on class actions and access to justice.

A researcher at the University of Windsor (Windsor, ON) will conduct research in Ontario, Alberta, and British Columbia on the motivations and experiences of self-represented litigants in civil and family law matters.

The Waterloo Region Community Legal Service (Kitchener, ON) will hire an Articling Student for 2012-2013 to provide legal information and services to linguistic minorities. This Articling position is funded through the Connecting Articling Fellowship program.

The Waterloo Region Community Legal Service (Kitchener, ON) will hire an Articling Student for 2014-2015 to provide legal information and services to linguistic minorities. This Articling position is funded through the Connecting Articling Fellowship program.

The West Coast Prison Justice Society (Abbotsford, BC) will hire a legal advocate dedicated to providing advice and assistance to Aboriginal prisoners who are currently incarcerated and dealing with legal issues in prison.

The Workers’ Action Centre (Toronto, ON) will train community and front-line organizations working with linguistic minorities and rural communities on employment standards and human rights in employment. This is a Connecting Communities project with legal and non-legal partners.

YWCA Canada (Toronto, ON) will train frontline staff at 10 YWCA shelters in Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, the Northwest Territories, and Nunavut. The training will prepare staff to assist Aboriginal victims of domestic violence by improving their knowledge of the justice system.